Monday, May 21, 2018

She Did It Her Way

My friend Joanie crossed over the Rainbow Bridge Saturday night.



(Yes, people cross over the Rainbow Bridge, too, not just pets. Otherwise, how would we find all our pets when we get there?)

Joanie has been my friend for the past nearly 18 years. I'm sure everyone who ever met her considered her their friend, too. She had a way of making people feel that she was interested in them and cared about them, and she made people want to spend time with her, too.

My friendship with Joanie started when she showed up on my doorstep right after we moved into our condo in Elk Run, right across from hers, in September, 2000. She came with a basket of goodies, including Moose Poop (better than it sounds).

She told me later that she hadn't included a bottle of wine because we might be Mormon--this is Utah, after all. Joanie and Ev's windows looked down into ours, and she could see everything that went on in our living area, she told me later. As she watched us uncork a new bottle of wine every night, she decided we probably weren't Mormon.

Over the next few years we shared a lot of adventures. I'll never forget how much fun we had. In many ways, we were very different, but that only added to the fun.

We discovered quickly that we shared interests in the fiber arts. We were both knitters, but Joanie was also a spinner and a weaver, and I was a quilter. We shared our passions with each other. Eventually, because of her, I learned to spin and weave...in fact, she talked my husband into buying her loom for me, so I'm now a weaver, too. 



I have thought of Joanie every time I've sat on that bench to weave and will do so until the weft and warp of life is done. Or they cart me off to someplace without Joanie's loom. If I'm not kicking and screaming, then it probably doesn't matter, but then the loom will go on to a new weaver.

Joanie and I did a lot of knitting together, including making "Sam the Ram."



We were both intimidated by the pattern, so we decided to work on it together. Joanie usually came to my house for these sessions. I would read the directions from the pattern for the part we were on, and we would knit that section. We called ourselves the "Sheepish Ladies." 

Sam had a seed stitch pattern across his chest. It's pretty much like ribbing, (K1,P1) across. I knit Continental style, so it went fast for me. Joanie knit English/American style, so she had to move the yarn front-to-back and back-to-front after every stitch, which is much slower. When we got to that part, I would get to the end of my section and go put the kettle on while she continued. We always laughed about that. It wasn't a race. We adapted to each other. That project taught me how to read charts. At some point, everything fell into place. If I hadn't had to figure it out for Joanie, I wouldn't be doing the knitting that I'm doing today.

The horns were complicated, but we got them done. Then it was time to stuff Sam. Joanie found someone she was able to talk into giving us some real fleece from some white sheep for the body stuffing. We were afraid the white should show through the darker head and feet, so I provided some poodle hair (almost the same as sheep, I think).

Joanie introduced me to crafts I knew little about, like Scherenschnitte. (I think that's what this is.) 



One of my most treasured gifts from her is this piece.



It will hang in a place of honor in our new home, as it has in the one we're leaving.

Joanie joined the groups I participated in, Vintage Stitchers and Common Threads. She always had something to share, like this porcupine (or a seal, or a bat).



And she often was inspired by a friend to take on a new project.



Her eye for design showed up in everything, such as this quilt, which we worked on together, paper-pieced pine trees.



Here it is, on the wall, which she made me measure when we were designing the quilt:



(Quilting was done by our mutual friend Julie, who also helped with the piecing.) It was a fun group project for the handful of us who helped her with it.

My friends became her friends. We attended her parties, like her Halloween Spooktakular, where we became acquainted with other friends of hers...many of them, anyway.






Or we went out to breakfast, a special birthday treat. Joanie knew all the best places to eat.



Then there was her wonderful 80th birthday party at a friend's house.





We shared an interest in antiques and went to the Acorn Antique Fair in Ogden a couple of times a year as long as she was able. We would stop for breakfast at Morgan, then drive on to the fair. The last time we went together, we found that she wasn't the only one being wheeled around.



We would have lunch at the train station and then wander through the shops, sometimes ending up at the Needlepoint Joint or Shepherd's Bush before heading home. Occasionally, we would stop on the way home for dessert at Taggart.

I'll never forget the time when we arrived in Morgan for breakfast, only to discover Joanie didn't have any money. At all! She had left her purse at home...but she had her knitting bag with her. I paid for our breakfast, but when she found a Navajo rug at the fair she "had to have," I put it on my credit card. ("Charlie won't mind. He will like the points," I said.) She gave me a check when we got home. I always asked after that, "Do you have your purse?" And we would look at each other and laugh. (The rug turned out to be a good buy.)

Joanie also had a wonderful sense, knowledge and understanding of design that carried over into everything she did. She taught me to embrace neutrals and order, and I hope I brought a little bright color and some spontaneity into her life. For instance, this is her fiber studio:



And this is mine.



I do have an "after" photo, but this is about my friend.

Joanie could always make me laugh. I hope I did the same. After our puppy had a second close call with wild-mushroom ingestion requiring another quick trip to the vet, Joanie gave me this book.




Funny, yet practical.

We shared this love of animals. She loved my animals and I loved hers. My gift to her one year was a framed photo I had taken of her sweet kitty, Kasha.



Joanie wouldn't be bullied or pushed into doing anything she didn't want to do, although--to me at least--she always seemed to finesse the situation so everyone ended up thinking they had had their way or thought she was right. When the time came that she was unable to climb the stairs, Joanie installed chairlifts on each of her two stairways. When she was unable to care for herself, she hired Ana, who also became a friend. Oxygen tubes went everywhere. She didn't want to leave her home. The few times she was in the hospital, she just wanted to go home. She went home and managed to stay in her home until the end.

Joanie, you go, girl!

Thank you, Joanie, for being my friend. You have enriched my life.

Saturday, May 19, 2018

Great Northern Caper

The Lace Caper Dress
by Peggy Stuart 

Copied from a photo on Pinterest of a dress made by a Russian designer. This pattern is made to fit Gotz Hannah, Happy Kidz and Classic Kidz. Modifications might be needed to fit other 18-19” dolls. Bodice is worked back and forth. Skirt and sleeves are worked in the round or flat. 


Materials:
Yarn: 4-ply/fingering yarn, 1 50g ball. 45g of Knit Picks Palette was used.
Needles: 2.25mm/US1 - 2.75mm/US2, or size needed to get gauge for bodice, 2 sets of dpns , 2 circulars or 1 long circular 32” or longer for Magic Loop.
Buttons: 3 3/8” buttons.
Other notions: Small amount of tulle, optional, stitch markers or yarn scraps.
Gauge: 32 sts and 44 rows = 4” over stockinette st. (Leaves or diamonds should measure 1 1/4"/3.1cm from top to bottom.
(Note: I have put the buttonholes at both ends. This makes it easier to know where to sew on the buttons.) 



Dress:

Ribbing: CO 69 sts. Work 3 rows of 1 X 1 ribbing, starting with P. You place marker after 13, 10, 23, 10 sts with 13 left, or instead you can wrap the K1 stitches with a contrast yarn (see photo, below).



If you do this, the sts wrapped are the 13th, 23rd, 47th and 57th, with 12 sts left. The yarn is easily taken out and moved upward as you work that st. It's important that the M1L comes before the marked stitch and the M1R comes after.

Bodice (using chart)

Row 1: RS, (Buttonhole Row. Slip markers or move yarn as you come to them.) K1, YO, k2tog, k9, M1L, K1, M1R, K9, M1L, K1, M1R, Work first row of chart on next 23 sts (stitches added with the increases bring it to 25), M1L, K1, M1R, K9, M1L, K1, M1R, K9, K 1, YO, K2tog. (77 sts)  
Row 2 and all WS rows: K3, P to last 3 sts, K3.
Row 3 and all RS rows through row 15, slipping markers or moving yarn as you come to them: K to Marker or yarn, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker or yarn, M1L, K1, M1R, work row of chart, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker or yarn, M1L, K1, K to end. (133 sts at end of Row 15)


Row 17: (Buttonhole Row) K1, YO, K2tog, K17, M1L, K1, M1R, K25, M1L, K1, starting with P1, work Row 17 of chart, ending with P1 (increases are built into the YOs in chart), K1, M1R, K25, M1L, K1, M1R, K17 K1, YO, K2tog. (141 sts)
Row 19a: (Sleeve divide if working the sleeves in the round) Removing markers or yarn as you come to them, K21 and place next 29 sts on waste yarn. CO 2, continue across 41 front sts according to chart, place next 29 sts on waste yarn, CO 2, K to last end. (87 sts) 
Place markers after 23rd and 64th sts for chart borders. 
Row 19b: (Sleeve divide for working sleeves flat) Removing markers or yarn as you come to them, K21 and place these sts on waste yarn or holder, CO 1, K 29 sts, turn and work 3 rows of 1X1 ribbing, BO. Reattach yarn at underarm, CO2, SSK, (K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, CDD) 3 times, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, SSK, K next 29 sts, CO1, turn and work 3 rows of 1X1 ribbing, BO, reattach yarn again, CO 2, K to last end. (87 sts)


Row 20 and all WS rows to bottom of chart, Row 48: K3, P to last 3 sts, K3.
Rows 21, 23: K to 1 st before marker, Sl1, RM, work CDD incorporating st previously slipped, replace marker right before CDD just made, continue with chart to last two sts before next marker, Sl2, RM, Sl1 st back onto left needle and work CDD incorporating 1 st from next section, replace marker just after CDD, K to end. 2 sts decreased. (Row 21: 85 sts, Row 23: 83 sts)
Row 25 and all RS Rows through Row 47 except Rows 33 (Buttonhole Row), 35, 37 and 39: K to marker, SM, work chart, SM, K to end. 
Row 33: (Buttonhole Row) K1, YO, K2tog, K to 1 st before marker, Sl1, RM, work CDD incorporating st previously slipped, replace marker just before CDD, continue with chart to last two sts before next marker, Sl2, RM, Sl1 st back onto left needle and work CDD incorporating 1 st from next section, replace marker just after CDD, K to last 3 sts, K1, YO, K2tog. 2 sts decreased. (Markers should now be before first CDD and after last CDD in Row 33.)


Rows 35, 37 and 39: K3, K to 1 st before marker, Sl1, RM, work CDD incorporating st previously slipped, continue with chart to last two sts before next marker,  Sl2, RM, Sl1 st back onto left needle and work CDD incorporating 1 st from next section, K to end, replacing markers as for Row 33. 2 sts decreased. At the end of this section of chart you should have 75 sts.

Bodice (written directions)

CO and work ribbing and place markers as written.
Row 1: RS, (Buttonhole Row.) K1, YO, k2tog, k9, M1L, K1, M1R, K9, M1L, K1, M1R, K1, K2tog, K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, CDD, K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, SSK, K1, M1L, K1, M1R, K9, M1L, K1, M1R, K9, K 1, YO, K2tog. (77 sts) 
Row 2 and all WS rows: K3, P to last 3 sts, K3. 
Row 3: K 12 (to marker), M1L, K1, M1R, K 11, (to marker) M1L, K1, M1R, K2, K2tog, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, CDD, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, SSK, K2, M1L, K1, M1R, K11 (to marker), M1L, K1, K to end. (85 sts)
Row 5: K to Marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K1, (YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K5) 2 times, YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K1, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to end. (93 sts)
Row 7: K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker or yarn, M1L, K1, M1R, K3, (YO, CDD, YO, K7) 2 times, YO, CDD, YO, K3, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to end. (101 sts)


Row 9: K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K2tog, (K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, CDD) 2 times, K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, SSK, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to end. (109 sts)
Row 11: K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker or yarn, M1L, K1, M1R, K1, K2tog, (K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, CDD) 2 times, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, SSK, K1, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to end. (117 sts)
Row 13: K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, (YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K5) 3 times, YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to end. (125 sts)
Row 15: K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K2, (YO, CDD, YO, K7) 3 times, YO, CDD, YO, K2, M1L, K1, M1R, K to 1 st before marker, M1L, K1, M1R, K to end. (133 sts) 
Row 17: (Buttonhole Row. There is no M1 at either end of lace section; increases are built in with the YOs) K1, YO, K2tog, K17, M1L, K1, M1R, K25, M1L, K1, P1, (K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, CDD) 3 times, K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, P1, K1, M1R, K25, M1L, K1, M1R, K17 K1, YO, K2tog. (141 sts) 
Row 19a: (Sleeve divide for working  sleeves in the round) Removing markers or yarn as you come to them, K21 and place next 29 sts on waste yarn. CO 2, SSK, (K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, CDD) 3 times, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, SSK, place next 29 sts on waste yarn, CO 2, K to last end. (87 sts) 
Row 19b: (Sleeve divide for working sleeves flat) Removing markers or yarn as you come to them, K21 and place these sts on waste yarn or holder, CO 1, K 29 sts, turn and work 3 rows of 1X1 ribbing, BO. Reattach yarn at underarm, CO2, SSK, (K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, CDD) 3 times, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2, SSK, K next 29 sts, CO1, turn and work 3 rows of 1X1 ribbing, BO, reattach yarn again, CO 2, K to last end. (87 sts) 
Row 20 and all WS rows to bottom of bodice, Row 48: K3, P to last 3 sts, K3. 
Row 21: K 22, (CDD, K1, YO, K5, YO, K1) 4 times, CDD, K2, K to end. 2 sts decreased. (85 sts) 
Row 23: K 21, (CDD, YO, K7, YO) 4 times, CDD, K to end. 2 sts decreased. (83 sts) 
Row 25: K 22, (YO, K3, CDD, K3, YO, K1) 4 times, K to end. (83 sts) 
Row 27: K 23, (YO, K2, CDD, K2, YO, K3) 3 times, YO, K2, CDD, K2, YO, K to end. (83 sts) 
Row 29: K 24, (YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K5) 3 times, YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K to end. (83 sts) 
Row 31: K25, (YO, CDD, YO, K7) 3 times, YO, CDD, YO, K to end. (83 sts) 
Row 33: K1, YO, K2tog, K 17, (CDD, K3, YO, K1, YO, K3) 4 times, CDD, K to last 2 sts, YO, K2tog. (81 sts) 
Row 35: K 19, (CDD, K2, YO, K3, YO, K2) 4 times, CDD, K to end. (79 sts) 
Row 37: K 18, (CDD, K1, YO, K5, YO, K1) 4 times, CDD, K to end. (77 sts) 
Row 39: K 17, (CDD, YO, K7, YO) 4 times, CDD, K to end. (75 sts) 
Row 41: K 18, (YO, K3, CDD, K3, YO, K1) 4 times, K to end. (75 sts) 
Row 43: K 19, (YO, K2, CDD, K2, YO, K3) 3 times, YO, K2, CDD, K2, YO, K to end. (75 sts) 
Row 45: K 20, (YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K5) 3 times, YO, K1, CDD, K1, YO, K to end. (75 sts) 
Row 47: K 21, (YO, CDD, YO, K 7) 3 times, YO, CDD, YO, K to end.

Continue with skirt.

Skirt section is worked with needle one size larger for more fullness. May be worked flat and seamed by working the K and P sts as they appear and P the YOs. **See further instructions for working flat at end of pattern.
Or: Using 2 sets of dpns, 2 circular needles or one longer circular needle and Magic Loop, work in the round.

Skirt (worked in the round)**

Set-up round: Place first and last 3 sts on 2 dpns and overlap (left over right) and K 1 stitch from each needle (as for a 3-needle BO) together, then P the 2nd and 3rd stitches from each together (this serves to join to work in the round). Then (K2, P2) to the end. (72 sts) You can place stitch markers at the beginning of each of the 18 sections if you want, but the pattern is easy to see after the first few rounds.




Rnd 1: K1, (P2, K1, YO, K1) to last 3 sts, P2, K1 YO. K the next st onto the end to hold the YO in place, and then the beginning of round will be the first of the P2 at the join.
Rnd 2, 3, 4: (P2, K3) to end.
Rnd 5: (P2, K1, YO, K1, YO, K1) to end.
Rnd 6 and all other non-pattern rnds: (P2, K to end of section) to end.
Rnds 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, 33 and 37: (P2, K1, YO, K to last st in section, YO, K1) to end.
There are 414 sts after Rnd 37.
Continue until 40 rounds have been worked. Each section will be 23 sts. (414 sts) BO in pattern after Rnd 40.



Reattach yarn to sleeve opening and with dpns or circular needles PU 1 st at underarm, K to end of round, PU and K 1 st at underarm (31 sts). (K1, P1) to last 3 sts, K1, P2tog (30 sts). Work 2 more rounds of K1, P1 ribbing. BO in rib. 

Finishing: Weave in ends, sew buttons on left back closing extra buttonholes. Sew underarm sleeve seams and skirt if knit flat. Block. (Skirt hem will need heavy blocking.)

Abbreviations:
YO: Yarn over, also called yarn forward. Bring yarn to front and over needle. Work next st. It will make a hole. For this pattern, it is used for making button holes and follows K2tog, so no stitch increase.
CO: Cast on. Use long-tailed CO to start project. For flat version of sleeves and underarms, use backward-loop CO. 
BO: Bind off, cast off.
CDD: Central Double Decrease. Sl 1, K2tog, psso.
M1L: Pick up bar between sts through the front, K through back loop
M1R: Pick up bar between sts through the back, K through front loop
PM: Place marker.
SM: Slip marker.

For longer skirt,  increases may be made with more rounds between, such as every 3rd round for the swirled skirt or every 6th round for the balanced version.

**To work skirt flat, do not join back bands, but work first round as written, but K the last 3 sts. Row 2: Turn, BO 3 sts and work the sts as they appear (K the sts that appear as K, P the stitches that appear as P) and P the YOs. Work all RS rows as written for in the round and WS rows as Row 2, but without binding off any sts. You will need to overlap the bands and sew up the back when you finish the dress.




This pattern is protected by copyright.
Any items made from it may be sold.
Copyright © 2018 by Peggy Stuart 
Last update: 5/11/18


Chart below may also be viewed here: 
The K3tog and K3tog through back loop are not used in this pattern.


Tuesday, May 15, 2018

Old Books

Half Hours with the Best American Authors.






American Lands and Letters:






Works by John Locke




Virgil in Translation





Songs and Occasional Poems on Various Subjects by Captain Hall of the Indian Army:





Two sets of more recent books, works by Somerset Maugham and Louis Bromfield:






An assortment of other titles:









xxx



Some others:











In all, 4 1/2 to 5 boxes of books, including The Dialogues of Plato, a Dictionary of The Bible, The Exhaustive Concordance of The Bible and some of the classics, like The Last of the Mohicans and The Pickwick Papers, mostly from early to mid-20th century.